Faith and actions

I feel compelled to write this. There are many people out there who claim to be or are supposedly “men of the cloth” in whatever religion and act as clergy accordingly BUT still do what is against their own faith i.e. Serve meat/alcohol and/or beef/Pork. They call themselves holy men or followers if their faith…..what a joke-they don’t know their own faith!!!!

Take Muslims, it is haraam to drink or serve alcohol yet many do. For Jews and Muslims it is anti kosher to eat or sell pork yet many do. For Hindus, especially the clergy, they are not allowed to serve meat or alcohol yet many do AND carry out clergy functions. Is this the height of hypocrisy? Please advise me on belfastfoodman@hotmail.com

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36 thoughts on “Faith and actions

      • Belfast FoodMan

        Beg to differ, example would be a Muslim is told in Koran that anything to do with alcohol e.g. Handling, selling, serving or consuming is haraam and not halal so no Muslim should do yet we see restauranters and shop keepers here in UK of the Islamic faith OPENLY do this. So by definition from Koran they are non Halal and therefore haraam. This is not my definition it’s in the Koran

        Liked by 1 person

      • franklparker

        “we see restauranters and shop keepers here in UK of the Islamic faith OPENLY do this.”
        Are you sure they are ‘of the faith?’ By definition, if they were they would not do this. Bear in mind, however, that many people who claim to be of the Christian faith do many things forbidden by their holy book. It can be dangerous to jump to conclusions, as the Jewish lady explained earlier. Given that leaders of the Anglican Church cannot agree on whether or not gay marriage is permissible according to Bible teaching, criticising ordinary followers of Islam for a perceived disregard for archaic laws about the handling and consumption of certain foods does seem a bit petty.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Belfast FoodMan

        I’m merely stating fact and it’s what the Koran says, so it’s not being petty. It’s an example, I can give u other examples of people doing hypocritical things of different faith/religions, but I just wanted to air a point

        Like

      • franklparker

        Quotes from the Q’ran are fact, sure. But are you equally certain that the people you observe behaving in a way that goes against those rulings subscribe fully to ‘the faith’? And there are many different interpretations of the Islamic holy book, as there are of the Bible. I agree that, where someone is openly advocating a particular way of living but does not follow the same teaching in his or her own life, that is hypocrisy and is to be deplored. I contend that it is possible to be a good Christian whilst disregarding some of the rules laid down in the Bible. I do not know if the same is true of followers of Islam but would be very surprised if it is not.

        Liked by 1 person

  1. koolkosherkitchen

    As you felt compelled to write this, I feel compelled to dispel a common misconception about Jews and Jewish faith. A person is Jewish by virtue of being born Jewish, i.e. of a Jewish mother. Granted, conversion into a Jewish faith for those who were not born Jewish is possible, but it is a lengthy and complex learning process. However, nobody is born into Jewish faith. Unfortunately, there are many people out there who are Jewish by birth but not by faith. Those are the ones who not only eat pork and shellfish, but also do not observe any of the laws of Jewish faith. There is no hypocrisy in it, only ignorance and denial of their own heritage.
    With the utmost respect,
    Dolly

    Liked by 2 people

      • koolkosherkitchen

        They are Jewish, if they were born of a Jewish mother, and they can start observing the laws at any time, which is something many people do, learning little by little. There is no such thing as a Jewish function; Bar Mitzvah is simply 13th birthday, coming of age, so to speak. Modern celebrations are just celebrations, open to anyone whose parents want to spend money to throw a party. In terms of the law, there are certain things that a boy cannot do until he comes of age, such as being called upon to read from the Torah scroll or to lead the congregation in prayer. Therefore, in modern times, Bar Mitzvah boys do those things, in front of tearful friends and relatives, whether they e observant or not, and then everybody goes on to have a party. Same thing regarding weddings, funerals, etc.

        Liked by 3 people

      • koolkosherkitchen

        We haven’t had priests for more than 2,000 years, ever since the Temple was destroyed. Rabbi are not priests, or men of the cloth. The word means “teacher” and signifies someone who is more learned – much more learned!- than an average person, so we can ask him for guidance in matters regarding law. Theoretically, since they are so knowledgeable, they will be observing the law themselves. However, they are people, just like everyone else.

        Liked by 2 people

      • koolkosherkitchen

        I understand your point, and I will not presume to address other religions, but a rabbi is not even a “holder of the faith;”he is simply a repository of knowledge. I am not talking about some great and holy Rabbis, of course. Those are exceptions, not rules.

        Liked by 2 people

      • koolkosherkitchen

        P.S. I think I am not making myself clear. Rabbis do not teach faith, they clarify specific laws. We do not need a rabbi to perform a religious ceremony, although we presume that a rabbi would know better how to do it right. But all the rules are written, and if we need clarification or guidance, there are many”Ask the Rabbi” sites.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Belfast FoodMan

        So if a rabbi was to eat pork/sell pork and then teach His congregation is that correct. My point is that a Muslim cleric should not eat/sell Pork or alcohol as it is haraam and non halal, Hindu priests should ideally not sell/consume meat especially beef and alcohol and Rabbis should not sell/consume pork (non kosher) and then guide their flocks

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      • koolkosherkitchen

        Again, rabbis don’t have flocks, they are hired by groups of people who decide to get together and form a community, or a congregation. You are right though, a rabbi should not eat pork and then tell another Jew not to. Neither should any observant Jew, for that matter, and no observant Jew will do that. However, there is a large group of Jews called Reform, as opposed to Orthodox, whose philosophy is that the laws of the ancient times were good for ancient times, but are not necessary now. Those people do not observe any laws, including dietary restrictions, and their rabbis both eat pork and tell community members to eat it as well. I have never encountered an Orthodox rabbi who would either transgress the law himself or tell someone else to do himself, let alone do it himself, but tell others that it is forbidden. By the same token, I have never met an Orthodox person (not a rabbi) who would do that. There is a specific law about misleading people, and it is considered much worse than actually eating pork.

        Liked by 2 people

      • koolkosherkitchen

        There are only three things that are “banned” (deserve capital punishment). Those are: idolatry, incest, and murder. Pork is no more or no less banned than, for example, shrimp, or even chicken slaughtered in a non-kosher manner. However, for a purpose of saving a life or making an ill person well, all laws could – and should! – be transgressed, except for those three. Human life and well-being prevails!

        Liked by 2 people

  2. justsober

    I can only provide a Christian perspective. But the bottom line for a true believer in Jesus Christ is this..For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith–and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God–Ephesians 2:8. Also if look up Mark 7:1-23. Jesus’s comments on traditions, commandments and what defiles a person. Check out Matthew 7: 15-29. Might as well get it from the real source…not just my take👍. Unfortunately there is a lot of hypocrisy everywhere and religion is no exception. Be well. Btw, love all your blog posts..always making me hungry🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  3. franklparker

    You sparked a very informative discussion there, sir. I was going to suggest that two paragraphs of assertion without evidence was a cheeky thing to do. I know your interest is food but there are surely far worse crimes committed by priests and ‘men of the cloth’, in our own recent history on both sides of the border that separates this Island. And that includes most of the many versions of Christianity that prevail here.
    Having been brought up a Protestant (Anglican) I always associated the life of ‘Holy’ men and women as one of abstinence and restraint. I recall my first visit to Dublin, on business back in 1970, and my surprised seeing Nuns and Priests drinking and dining in the restaurant of the hotel in which I stayed.
    These days I am a non-believer who, like you, sees only hypocrisy among those who profess themselves to be followers of religion. I wrote a piece some time ago about the first English king to set foot in Ireland and his apparent hypocrisy. https://franklparker.com/hereford-ireland-history/henry-ii-a-right-royal-hypocrite/

    Liked by 1 person

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